GeoCatch acknowledges the Wadandi Saltwater people, the Traditional Owners of this land, and recognise their continuing connection to lands, waters and communities.

The Community's voice in the Catchment since 1997.
GeoCatch is a catchment management group working in partnership with the community, industry and agencies to care for the Geographe Bay Catchment.

Upcoming Events

Geographe Soil Testing Results Workshop

AccuSpread Field Day

If you need help registering for an event, please email geocatch@dwer.wa.gov.au or call GeoCatch on 0491 069 078.

Facebook Feed

41 minutes ago

GeoCatch
Keep and eye out for this weed, cottonbush. See below for more information from City of Busselton - Local Governmentm.facebook.com/story.php?story_fbid=pfbid0sSHcG9gBFY7V8CyYf4okbizXudz6yK8zCofE1byoEbAv3jNukLZLS3a... ... See MoreSee Less
View on Facebook

2 days ago

GeoCatch
Chris and Matty form the The Forever Project are setting up for our Catio and Gardening for Wildlife Workshop at Bunnings Busselton. Come on down from 11-3 today if you get a chance. Bunnings Warehouse Australia Bunnings Warehouse Australia City of Busselton - Local Government #petsawaypossumsplay F.A.W.N.A Inc. Busselton Men's Shed ... See MoreSee Less
View on Facebook

3 days ago

GeoCatch
Held as part of the Festival of Busselton's Dog Day Out, dogs and their owners gained the skills and confidence required to avoid possums that may be living in their backyards. The skills taught at the workshop are invaluable in keeping possums safe in an urban environment, as the western ringtail possum faces many threats, including predation from household pets.Twenty-four dogs and their human companions learned how to live with critically endangered western ringtail possums at GeoCatch’s recent event. Local dog trainer Asher Lindberg, from Geo Bay Dog Training, was on hand to deliver the workshop that was engaging for both dogs and owners. Here, Asher describes how to educate your dog to leave possums alone in your backyard.For information on upcoming workshops and what you can do to help protect the western ringtail possum, visit www.geocatch.asn.au/possum-avoidance-for-dogs/ #petsawaypossumsplay #busselton #westernringtailpossum #possums #geocatch #possum #nativeaustraliananimals #wildlife #criticallyendangered #dunsborough #ringtailpossum ... See MoreSee Less
View on Facebook

4 days ago

GeoCatch
World Wetlands Day is celebrated each year on 2 February to raise awareness about wetlands. This day also marks the anniversary of the Convention on Wetlands, which was adopted as an international treaty in 1971 in the Iranian city of Ramsar. The Vasse Wonnerup wetlands system were designated as a Ramsar wetland of international significance on 7 June 1990 because they meet two criteria:Criterion 5: A wetland should be considered internationally important if it regularly supports 20,000 or more waterbirds. The maximum record for Vasse Wonnerup was 34,500 waterbirds in December 1998.Criterion 6: A wetland should be considered internationally important if it regularly supports one per cent of the individuals in a population of one species or subspecies of waterbird. The Vasse Wonnerup regularly supports greater than 1% of populations of: Black-winged Stilt, Red-necked Avocet, Australian Shelduck and Australasian Shoveler.The entire Vasse Wonnerup system is of cultural and historical significance to the Wadandi people with registered sites of archaeological and spiritual significance throughout the area. The wetlands traditionally provided many sources of food such as waterbirds, marron, mullet, freshwater fish and mussels.The wetlands also provide an opportunity to experience a unique ecosystem close to an urban setting and are an important asset to the local community.More information on the wetlands can be found on the Revitalising Geographe Waterways website rgw.dwer.wa.gov.au/vasse-wonnerup-wetland/.#WorldWetlandsDay #WAEstuaries #ramsar ... See MoreSee Less
View on Facebook

5 days ago

GeoCatch
It's #WaterbirdWednesday! With the warm weather well and truly here, water levels in the Vasse and Wonnerup estuaries are dropping, leaving behind shallow water filled with fish, and mud flats rich in aquatic insects.This makes ideal conditions for large flocks of waterbirds, both local and international. At nearly 50 birds per hectare during peak times, the wetlands support one of the highest concentrations of waterbirds in Western Australia.These photos have been taken in both the Vasse and Wonnerup estuaries over the past few weeks, showing the abundance of waterbirds right on our doorstep!#WaterbirdWednesday #WAEstuaries #revitalisinggeographewaterways ... See MoreSee Less
View on Facebook
0
Seedlings Planted
0
Subscriber Network
0
% of Catchment Soil Tested

Featured Content